Wednesday, September 20, 2006

Men in Suits by Diane Perkins

While Candy has been watching TV (grin) I've been busy finishing up the revisions of my next Warner book, Desire in His Eyes. No time for Men in Trees but there is always time for Men In Suits.
Here's the man who started it all. Beau Brummell.


I've been reading the Ian Kelly biography of Beau Brummell. See my Risky Regency Blog.


















In writing that blog I stumbled upon the news that James Purefoy played Brummell on a BBC special. Apparently there is a scene of Brummell completing his morning dressing ritual including bathing......(Showing not only his nose, Elizabeth!)











Interestingly (to me, anyway), Brummell felt the perfect silhouette for male fashion should be taken from ancient Roman statues. James Purefoy was in the HBO miniseries Rome! Ironic!

Beau Brummell never sat for a portrait so we only know what he looked like from sketches. The sketches all seem more like caricatures to me, though. I'd like to think he really did look like James Purefoy.





Before Brummell's influence on fashion, men dressed like this.





(see Brummell in the middle? Ha! How could you miss him!)










Of course, since I write in the Regency period, I tend to love Men In Regency Suits. This is Lord Grantham and I think he is pretty hot!





















Here are two other Men In Regency Suits





















Of course, Gerard Butler in a suit is pretty hot, too!












Cheers!
Diane

4 comments:

Megan Crane said...

This is a glorious post, filled with glorious men.

Thanks, Diane!!

Rikz said...

Hot, hot, hot! Great blog, Diane... ;-)

Thank goodness for Beau Brummell. Men's fashion was terrible until he came along. Bright spark!

Elizabeth Hoyt said...

Ooo! Mr. Purfoy in hia bath! Thanks for the heads up, Diane. And I do love a man in a suit. Why is that, do you suppose?

Diane Perkins said...

Brummell would say it shows off the male silhouette effectively. I think it's the tailoring. A zoot suit wouldnt make me go ga-ga.
It's also the color. Brummell favored black or deep navy and I think he was on to something, because the light colors of the 70s didn't hang around too long.